The case of the missing black holes | Science & Technology

Researchers at the Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU) and Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI) at the University of Tokyo have applied the well-understood and highly verified quantum field theory, usually applied to the study of the very small, to a new target, the early universe. Their exploration led to the conclusion that there ought to be far fewer miniature black holes than most models suggest, though observations to confirm this should soon be possible. The specific kind of black hole in question could be a contender for dark matter.

The study of the universe can be a daunting thing, so let’s make sure we’re all on the same page. Though details are fuzzy, the general consensus amongst physicists is that the universe is about 13.8 billion years old, began with a bang, expanded rapidly in a period called inflation, and somewhere along the line went from being homogenous to containing detail and structure. Most of the universe is empty, but despite this, it appears to be significantly heavier than can be explained by what we can see — we call this discrepancy dark matter, and no one knows what this might be, but evidence is building that it might be black holes, specifically old ones.

“We call them primordial black holes (PBH), and many researchers feel they are a strong candidate for dark matter, but there would need to be plenty of them to satisfy that theory,” said graduate student Jason Kristiano. “They are interesting for other reasons too, as since the recent innovation of gravitational wave astronomy, there have been discoveries of binary black hole mergers, which can be explained if PBHs exist in large numbers. But despite these strong reasons for their expected abundance, we have not seen any directly, and now we have a model which should explain why this is the case.”

Kristiano and his supervisor, Professor Jun’ichi Yokoyama, presently the director of Kavli IPMU and RESCEU, have extensively…

Source www.sciencedaily.com

We use income earning auto affiliate links. More on Sponsored links.
Ad Amazon : The reality of UFOs and extraterrestrials is here for those with the courage to examine it. We are not alone! We are only one of many different humanoids in a universe teeming with other intelligent life?

Ad Amazon : Books UFO
Ad Amazon : Binoculars
Ad Amazon : Telescopes

Related Posts

AIR launches cargo version of flagship AIR ONE eVTOL | eVTOL

Airline Industry on Track to Achieve New Heights with Nearly Five Billion Flights and $1 Trillion in Revenue This Year | Airlines

Learn how the global airline companies expand operations in Indian travel market – Travel And Tour World | Airlines

EHang completes eVTOL demo in Saudi Arabia | eVTOL

Global airlines bet on India travel boom | Airlines

India, US working for training Isro astronauts at Nasa’s Johnson Space Center | India News | Space

Is American Airlines Group Inc (NASDAQ:AAL) the Best Airline Stock to Buy for Long Term? | Airline Industry

Air Incheon Emerges as Preferred Bidder for Asiana Airlines’ Cargo Business | Airlines

Actura New Zealand collapse: Parents may have lost million of dollars after school space trip cancelled | Space

U.S. Navy Rescues Crew of Stricken Cargo Ship Attacked by Houthis | Aviation

Pentagon backs France’s supply of Mirage 2000s to Ukraine | Airlines

KLM Boeing 787 returns to Tokyo after windshield cracks | Airlines

Norwegian F-35 To Fly Using Biofuel By The End of The Year | Aviation

Women Are Better Than Men At One More Thing: Space Exploration | Space

Globetrotting NASA Research Model Increases Accuracy | Space

Eyes On Mediterranean And Black Sea: U.S. Navy MQ-4Cs Expand Operations In The 6th Fleet Area Of Responsibility | Aviation

Astroscale’s space junk inspection satellite snaps a close-up photo of a discarded rocket stage | Space

Investigating the origins of the crab nebula | Science & Technology

NASA Awards Contract for Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory Operations | Space

TechCrunch Space: A new era for human spaceflight research | Space